09-2016-blog-first-friday-georgia-chromeGeorgia Chrome’s known for their soulful sound and rocking covers of country hits, old school Americana, and more. On Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m., they’ll take the stage in the Eastmark Fall First Friday Concert Series.

We know their tunes will inspire some groovin’ on the grass, so this Friday we’re laying out the dance floor so concertgoers can kick up their heels in style. If your dancing boots are a little dusty, arrive early at 6:30 p.m. to learn a couple line dances and the two-step from a professional dance instructor, then show off your fancy footwork on the dance floor as Georgia Chrome turns up the volume.

Don’t be discouraged if your rhythm is a little, ahem, rough. Line dances (like the Electric and Cha-Cha slides) are a repeating series of steps danced in unison in lines or rows. Everyone faces the same direction and performs the steps at exactly the same time. So you can always follow along with the guy or gal right in front of you.

Believe it not, the first line dances did not originate from country and western dancing. Early influences came from “contra dancing,” an American folk dance where dancers form two parallel lines and perform dance sequences with different partners down the length of the line. Line dancing took off in the heart of the disco era, and it wasn’t until the 80s and 90s that line dances were created for popular country songs like “Achy Breaky Heart” and “Watermelon Crawl.”

Quick, quick, slow, slow. Quick, quick, slow, slow.

The country two-step is as American as apple pie. This popular partner dance has a “leader” and a “follower,” where the leader sets the dance patterns as the pair moves counterclockwise around the dance floor. Why counterclockwise? The theory goes that the dance moves to the left because the right side was the power position. Plus, it’s thought that if the dance moved clockwise, the larger male dancers would block the audience’s view of the female dancers. Either way, the two-step lets you grab a partner and glide across the dance floor for a kickin’ good time.

You’re sure to work up an appetite with all that boot scootin’, so here’s the food truck rundown for the night. Eats and treats will be ready for purchase starting at 6:30 p.m.:

Eastmark’s First Friday concerts are free and open to the public, so round up your family, friends and neighbors and join us for a festive night of live music and food truck fare. Blankets, low-back chairs, picnic baskets and coolers are also welcome. For the safety of your pet and those around you, please leave Fido at home.

Questions? Give a shout out to the Eastmark Community Life Team at 480-625-3005 or CommunityLife@eastmarkcom.